SEXUAL HARASSMENT

If you have been sexually harassed in the workplace, you may have a claim against the perpetrator and your employer.

Our team has a proven track record of successfully representing clients who have been sexually harassed at work and are dedicated to protecting your rights and guiding you through the legal process.

How can we help?

We understand the devastating impact that sexual harassment can have on an employee’s work and personal life.

If you have been sexually harassed at work, our team is here to support you and fight for your rights.

With years of experience handling sexual harassment claims, we are dedicated to helping you navigate the legal processes so that we may protect your interests.

01

Get in touch.

Call us on (02) 8287 3118¬†or email us at enquiries@axelegal.com.au. We’re here to help and our first consultation is free of charge.

02

Tell us what happened.

We provide advice on your situation in simple terms and work with you to determine the best course of action and next steps.

03

Let us resolve your matter.

We pursue the sexual harassment claim on your behalf and get you the outcome you want to achieve as quickly and cost effectively.

Client Testimonials

I was overwhelmed and unsure of where to turn after experiencing sexual harassment at work. The team at Axe Legal was compassionate and understanding and they helped me every step of the way. I am appreciative for their expertise and support and I would highly recommend them to anyone in a similar situation.
Isabella
The team at Axe Legal was a godsend when I was dealing with sexual harassment at work. They were knowledgeable, professional and always available to answer my questions. I am so grateful for their help and I would not hesitate to recommend them to anyone who has been a victim of sexual harassment in the workplace and in need of legal assistance.
Farah

Common Questions

Sexual harassment is any unwanted or unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favours, or other conduct of a sexual nature that a reasonable person would anticipate would offend, humiliate, or intimidate the person being harassed.

Sexual harassment can take many forms, including physical contact, comments or jokes of a sexual nature, and non-verbal actions such as leering or staring.

Some things you can do include:

  • Make it clear to the person harassing you that their behaviour is not acceptable and that you want it to stop. You can do this by telling the person directly, or by making a complaint to your employer.
  • Keep a record of the harassment, including the date, time, location, and details of what happened. This can be helpful if you decide to make a complaint or take legal action.
  • Seek support from friends, family, or a counsellor, and if appropriate see your doctor.

Yes, an employer can be held liable for sexual harassment of an employee at work under the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 (Cth), the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth), and the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW).

These laws make it unlawful for an employer to allow sexual harassment to occur in the workplace, or to fail to take reasonable steps to prevent it from occurring. If an employee is sexually harassed at work and the employer is found to be liable, the employee may be entitled to compensation for any losses or damages they have suffered as a result of the harassment. It is important for employers to have policies and procedures in place to prevent and address sexual harassment in the workplace.

Under the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 (Cth), the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth) and the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW), there are time limits for making a complaint for sexual harassment.

If you want to make a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission, you must do so within 12 months of the last incident of sexual harassment.

If you want to make a complaint to the New South Wales Anti-Discrimination Board, you must do so within 6 months of the last incident of sexual harassment.

If you want to make a complaint to the Fair Work Commission (FWC), you must do so within 21 days of the last incident of sexual harassment.

It is important to act promptly if you believe you have been sexually harassed at work, as these time limits are strict and may not be extended in certain circumstances. If you miss the time limit for making a complaint, you may be unable to pursue legal action. It is a good idea to seek legal advice as soon as possible if you believe you have been sexually harassed at work.

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